How to use tone to create your space Part 2

One colour with variation:  Create interest and harmony in you space when you use one colour but different tints, tones and shades.

One colour with variation: Create interest and harmony in you space when you use one colour but different tints, tones and shades.

Welcome back to this 2 part series on using tone to decorate your home. In Part 1 I explained the tonal scale, and demonstrated how the deliberate use of tone in your space was crucial to creating the overall atmosphere you desire; from dreamy, to dynamic, to bold & broody. It is the design element to check with you have seemingly done everything right, but something still feels off.  Now lets delve into understanding Tints, Tones and Shades.

Colour + Tint, Tone or Shade
People often confuse the terms Tint, Tone and Shade, and use them interchangeably. In fact, each creates a different effect when working with colour:
Tint = Adding white to a colour (a lot or a little bit; often referred to as pastels)
Tone = Adding grey to a colour (a lot of a little bit; can be any grey across the scale)
Shade = Adding black to a colour (a lot or a little bit, can significantly alter the colour with just a little)
Using Tint, Tone and Shade to vary colour opens up a whole world of diversity in colour, when it come to styling your space; yet ensure harmony when because you're using variations of the same colour.

Tips to working with colour and the tonal range
Know  your range: Decide what atmosphere you want to create, then choose the tonal range to match. 
Colour Theory: Colours which have been reduced with white, grey and black will still adhere to the rules of colour theory.
Sophisticated colour:  Love colour but want to be sophisticated? Be subtle, and avoid bold and bright. Tints, Tones and Shades allow you to decorate with your favourite colour, without it feeling childish or over-bearing.
Colour for kids: Especially in the bedroom, avoid bright and unaltered primary and secondary colours which are stimulating, making sleep more challenging.

Check out these great examples of tonal colour in action. Read the captions to understand what is happening in each image. 

Didn't read Part 1 first? Click here.

One of these is not like the others:  When one element is significantly different tonally to the rest of the space, it feels out of place - much like this green colour, which is quite a bit darker. Removing it will create harmony,

One of these is not like the others: When one element is significantly different tonally to the rest of the space, it feels out of place - much like this green colour, which is quite a bit darker. Removing it will create harmony,

Same blue, different tone:  A collection of blue and white china and complimentary decor pieces using the same blue in different tones.

Same blue, different tone: A collection of blue and white china and complimentary decor pieces using the same blue in different tones.

Bright and unified:  Grouping   books together by colour in a current styling trend. Depth and unity is achieved when the same colour is represented in different tints, tones and shades.

Bright and unified: Grouping books together by colour in a current styling trend. Depth and unity is achieved when the same colour is represented in different tints, tones and shades.

Not too bright:  Avoid overbearing and stimulating colours in children's bedrooms by using tints, tones and tones.

Not too bright: Avoid overbearing and stimulating colours in children's bedrooms by using tints, tones and tones.